Wednesday, October 1, 2014
frellyeahfoxfriends:

This may be the most beautiful fox I’ve ever seen

frellyeahfoxfriends:

This may be the most beautiful fox I’ve ever seen

(Source: flickr.com)

  • me: i don't even care. i'm not going to talk about this anymore.
  • ...
  • me: and you know what else? [2000 word rant]

spaceplasma:

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the world’s largest and most powerful particle collider, built by the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). The LHC is designed to answer some of the most profound questions about the universe: What is the origin of mass? Why are we made of matter and not antimatter? What is dark matter made of? It could also provide important new clues about conditions in the very early universe, when the four forces of nature were rolled into one giant superforce.

  • For more information click: here

Credit: Michael Hirst

engrprof:

engineeringpoodles:

sarakstar:

Did you know that Egypt, has the fewest pyramids in Africa?
 Did you know that Sudan, Ethiopia and Zimbabwe have more pyramids (225 pyramids in Sudan alone) then all of Egypt.
 There are remains of pyramids in South Africa, all the way along the Eastern and Northern parts of Africa and archeologists now believe that they may have found the remains of pyramids in West Africa. Why are we only taught that what is now known as Egypt (that tiny strip of land) is the only place where pyramids are in Africa, when in fact the ENTIRE continent of Africa (nearly 400 pyramids not just the six in Egypt) And Archeologist now believe that the pyramids in southern Africa may be the OLDEST pyramids in the world, followed by The Sudanese and Ethiopian pyramids, the West African pyramid ruins, and the North African Pyramids of so-called Egypt. (And im not even going to get into the fact that there are younger pyramids stretching FROM Africa in China, Italy, Europe and South America) WOW Im Amazed
neffera tiy maat bringing one truth at a time  Yaaaaaa

I did not know that.

Google this a bit. It’s fascinating!Lots of different styles and periods.

engrprof:

engineeringpoodles:

sarakstar:

Did you know that Egypt, has the fewest pyramids in Africa?

Did you know that Sudan, Ethiopia and Zimbabwe have more pyramids (225 pyramids in Sudan alone) then all of Egypt.

There are remains of pyramids in South Africa, all the way along the Eastern and Northern parts of Africa and archeologists now believe that they may have found the remains of pyramids in West Africa. Why are we only taught that what is now known as Egypt (that tiny strip of land) is the only place where pyramids are in Africa, when in fact the ENTIRE continent of Africa (nearly 400 pyramids not just the six in Egypt) And Archeologist now believe that the pyramids in southern Africa may be the OLDEST pyramids in the world, followed by The Sudanese and Ethiopian pyramids, the West African pyramid ruins, and the North African Pyramids of so-called Egypt. (And im not even going to get into the fact that there are younger pyramids stretching FROM Africa in China, Italy, Europe and South America) WOW Im Amazed

neffera tiy maat bringing one truth at a time  Yaaaaaa

I did not know that.

Google this a bit. It’s fascinating!
Lots of different styles and periods.

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Volcanoes seem to be a common topic these days. Yesterday Nautilus published a great piece by Aatish Bhatia on the 1883 eruption of Krakatoa, which tore the island apart and unleashed a sound so loud it was heard more than 4800 km away:

The British ship Norham Castle was 40 miles from Krakatoa at the time of the explosion. The ship’s captain wrote in his log, “So violent are the explosions that the ear-drums of over half my crew have been shattered. My last thoughts are with my dear wife. I am convinced that the Day of Judgement has come.”
In general, sounds are caused not by the end of the world but by fluctuations in air pressure. A barometer at the Batavia gasworks (100 miles away from Krakatoa) registered the ensuing spike in pressure at over 2.5 inches of mercury1,2. That converts to over 172 decibels of sound pressure, an unimaginably loud noise. To put that in context, if you were operating a jackhammer you’d be subject to about 100 decibels. The human threshold for pain is near 130 decibels, and if you had the misfortune of standing next to a jet engine, you’d experience a 150 decibel sound. (A 10 decibel increase is perceived by people as sounding roughly twice as loud.) The Krakatoa explosion registered 172 decibels at 100 miles from the source. This is so astonishingly loud, that it’s inching up against the limits of what we mean by “sound.” #

Those are some mindbogglingly enormous numbers. Aatish does a wonderful job of explaining the science behind an explosion whose effects ricocheted through the atmosphere for days afterward. Check out the full article over at Nautilus.  (Image credit: Parker & Coward, via Wikipedia)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Volcanoes seem to be a common topic these days. Yesterday Nautilus published a great piece by Aatish Bhatia on the 1883 eruption of Krakatoa, which tore the island apart and unleashed a sound so loud it was heard more than 4800 km away:

The British ship Norham Castle was 40 miles from Krakatoa at the time of the explosion. The ship’s captain wrote in his log, “So violent are the explosions that the ear-drums of over half my crew have been shattered. My last thoughts are with my dear wife. I am convinced that the Day of Judgement has come.”

In general, sounds are caused not by the end of the world but by fluctuations in air pressure. A barometer at the Batavia gasworks (100 miles away from Krakatoa) registered the ensuing spike in pressure at over 2.5 inches of mercury1,2. That converts to over 172 decibels of sound pressure, an unimaginably loud noise. To put that in context, if you were operating a jackhammer you’d be subject to about 100 decibels. The human threshold for pain is near 130 decibels, and if you had the misfortune of standing next to a jet engine, you’d experience a 150 decibel sound. (A 10 decibel increase is perceived by people as sounding roughly twice as loud.) The Krakatoa explosion registered 172 decibels at 100 miles from the source. This is so astonishingly loud, that it’s inching up against the limits of what we mean by “sound.” #

Those are some mindbogglingly enormous numbers. Aatish does a wonderful job of explaining the science behind an explosion whose effects ricocheted through the atmosphere for days afterward. Check out the full article over at Nautilus.  (Image credit: Parker & Coward, via Wikipedia)

Charlotte Bronte

literarystarbucks:

Charlotte Brontë goes up to the counter for a cup of tea and Reader, she orders it!

fishstickmonkey:

A thin solar prominence appeared above the Sun, then sprouted numerous streams of plasma back into the Sun before disappearing a day later (July 28-29, 2014). The prominence and its streams are being controlled by forces associated with strong magnetic fields beneath the prominence. These images were taken in extreme ultraviolet light. Credit: Solar Dynamics Observatory/NASA. (via SDO | Solar Dynamics Observatory)

fishstickmonkey:

A thin solar prominence appeared above the Sun, then sprouted numerous streams of plasma back into the Sun before disappearing a day later (July 28-29, 2014). The prominence and its streams are being controlled by forces associated with strong magnetic fields beneath the prominence. These images were taken in extreme ultraviolet light. Credit: Solar Dynamics Observatory/NASA. (via SDO | Solar Dynamics Observatory)

Tuesday, September 30, 2014
medievalvisions:

Leeds Castle Bath by pixiepie.

medievalvisions:

Leeds Castle Bath by pixiepie.