Wednesday, September 3, 2014

Things (re)discovered while taking screencaps of Act 5 Scene 2: Isabelle’s nameless Lady in Waiting being protective and feisty / SALISBURY being really quite impressed with her.

So, yeah. I think I ship it.

ghostbees:

Those annoying disguises, for summerfish

ghostbees:

Those annoying disguises, for summerfish

Tuesday, September 2, 2014
a little more than kin, and less than kind.

William Shakespeare, Hamlet.

This is how Hamlet first speaks to Claudius who is now both his uncle and step father. 

"Kind" here can be interpreted in two different ways. It could be taken at face value since Hamlet knows that Claudius killed his father. It can also be understood as "natural" since it is in Shakespeare’s habit to use "kind" in that sense. It is, of course, unnatural during the Elizabethan era at least for a man to kill his brother and marry his sister-in-law. 

(via shakespeareismyjam)

"during the Elizabethan era"?
Is it natural now and I missed a memo? (JK)
Good analysis.

(via engrprof)

He didn’t know at that point though, did he. Those are the first words Hamlet says to Claudius in the play, and even after he met the ghost he isn’t entirely sure if his father was actually murdered. Still an interesting analysis. After all, murdering his father isn’t exactly the only problem Hamlet has with Claudius.

(Source: understanding-poetry)

shredsandpatches:

runecestershire:

So I know Richard II so well that I can watch a foreign language production and understand every bit ofit, but there’s still so much about the play that I haven’t thoroughly contemplated yet or that hasn’t even crossed my mind. I LOVE SHAKESPEARE!

A couple of years ago during the Globe to Globe Festival they livestreamed all the productions on the internet, and I was able to watch Richard II done by a Palestinian company in sporadically-subtitled Arabic, and it was still perfectly clear — and completely amazing. Sami Metwasi’s Richard is one of the best I’ve seen, even though I couldn’t, strictly speaking, understand a word he said.

(I have a photoset of it somewhere; I should reblog it, just ‘cause)

Also, I still notice new things about this play sometimes and I’ve been obsessing over it for 14 years!

I’ve read about this production. It got amazing reviews. I wish I were able to see it.

fiftysevenacademics:

harkerling:

fiftysevenacademics:

harkerling:

What’s up with “hivei”? Google Translate has it as “temples”, but it’s not in the usual dictionaries that I check and the only Hungarian-language search results I’m getting have it in conjunction with the concept of polygamy, which… maybe? 

Found it! király=king; hívei=advocates. You could translate this as “the king’s advocates”. However, I have found hívei in a variety of contexts where English might use other terms instead of advocates:
http://en.bab.la/dictionary/hungarian-english/hivei
iszlám hívei
Jézus hívei
poligámia hívei
buddhizmus hívei
katolikus hívei
Humor Hívei (which appears to be a Hungarian humor web network)
I have also found it associated with places and, specifically, works on ethnicity. It appears to imply a more passionate kind of advocacy than English speakers usually mean when they use it. This might be why they used hívei instead of “advisors” or some other word.
Someone who speaks Hungarian will hopefully chime in.

This is super interesting! In terms of defining them with regard to their support of the king, rather than his corresponding favor for them, it’s a neat nuance. Thank you for digging deeper into this, I’m gonna be thinking about it for ever now. (Also d’oh, I was missing an accent mark! That explains some of this!)

I also like the way it defines them as supporters, rather than as favorites of a capricious king. (Not that I’m giving up my minion-shipping, though.) I wonder if it has a meaning more like “adherent”? Also, I don’t think the accent mark matters that much. I saw it both ways and it took me a while to find the actual definition even using the accent mark.

fiftysevenacademics:

harkerling:

fiftysevenacademics:

harkerling:

What’s up with “hivei”? Google Translate has it as “temples”, but it’s not in the usual dictionaries that I check and the only Hungarian-language search results I’m getting have it in conjunction with the concept of polygamy, which… maybe? 

Found it! király=king; hívei=advocates. You could translate this as “the king’s advocates”. However, I have found hívei in a variety of contexts where English might use other terms instead of advocates:

http://en.bab.la/dictionary/hungarian-english/hivei

iszlám hívei

Jézus hívei

poligámia hívei

buddhizmus hívei

katolikus hívei

Humor Hívei (which appears to be a Hungarian humor web network)

I have also found it associated with places and, specifically, works on ethnicity. It appears to imply a more passionate kind of advocacy than English speakers usually mean when they use it. This might be why they used hívei instead of “advisors” or some other word.

Someone who speaks Hungarian will hopefully chime in.

This is super interesting! In terms of defining them with regard to their support of the king, rather than his corresponding favor for them, it’s a neat nuance. Thank you for digging deeper into this, I’m gonna be thinking about it for ever now. (Also d’oh, I was missing an accent mark! That explains some of this!)

I also like the way it defines them as supporters, rather than as favorites of a capricious king. (Not that I’m giving up my minion-shipping, though.) I wonder if it has a meaning more like “adherent”? Also, I don’t think the accent mark matters that much. I saw it both ways and it took me a while to find the actual definition even using the accent mark.

discardingimages:

smiling death in a condom hat'The Dawnce of Makabre' from Carthusian miscellany, Yorkshire or Lincolnshire ca. 1460-1500.
BL, Add 37049, fol. 32r

discardingimages:

smiling death in a condom hat

'The Dawnce of Makabre' from Carthusian miscellany, Yorkshire or Lincolnshire ca. 1460-1500.

BL, Add 37049, fol. 32r

russian literature: a summary

ivan ivanovich ivanov is an upper middle class student who is madly in love with maria petrovna petrova!
BUT maria petrovna petrova loves dmitri dmitrivich dmitrov who is a nihilist upper middle class student!
ivan ivanovich ivanov goes through a long soul-searching journey before realizing all life is petty and meaningless and eventually dying alone and unloved of tuberculosis
while dmitri dmitrivich dmitrov marries maria petrovna petrova

Apotheosis Now (via poesizing)

(Source: kylebroflovsky)